Newspaper Article Archive of
The Kalona News
Kalona, Iowa
Lyft

Newspaper Article Archive of
The Kalona News

October 25, 2018 Rating human intelligence as superior is a stretch
Article Pages -- as published on the The Kalona News website.

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ARTICLE DESCRIPTION:

I am constantly amazed at the elevated level of intelligence displayed by all the dogs and cats we casually and simply refer to as “our pets.”

Our attitude clearly indicates we consider ourselves the superior factor. But, if that is true, how come “our pets” know more than we do about the benefits of always stretching one’s body completely, from end to end, upon each need for rising from a reclining position?

They never fail to duly stretch each leg, the entire spine (front to back and back to front), and every inch in between; sometimes more than once – unless, of course, they are suddenly startled, in which case a required hasty retreat will call for a lightning speed departure without preparation.

Since humans aren’t accustomed to responding in any such comparable ways they will always be regarded expectedly slower. It might have something to do with an inborn human resistance to subservient responsibilities … or something of that nature.

The disparity in the mobile abilities of each of these two noted families, “humans” and “pets” became quite clear to me during the past two years. I have been engaged in recovering from the effects of a slip and fall accident. It has left me still recovering and still subjected to watching my feline companions do their regular stretch routines even though they don’t have any injuries to recover from, at least no major ones that would parallel the kind we humans incur.

We humans have a tendency to believe we are able to avoid injury in a fashion similar to that in which pets are thought able to survive, something cats often amazingly can. We’re not always so lucky, which leads one to think perhaps it could be the result of the pets’ daily exercise ritual kicking in as the rescue in times of need.

Somehow our attitude of superior ability doesn’t equate well toward supporting the matter of humans assuming they’re in better stead than pets, and lends to pondering: who is really of leading intelligence?

I can’t begin to calculate how many times I have watched not only my cats, but other people’s dog and cat pets, perform the rise and stretch routine.

What’s wrong with us? Is it because of being the proposed more intelligent populous we can’t get the hang of the routine as a necessary matter of rote?

Maybe if we were to perform the rise-and-stretch process on a regular basis every day and not just after we’ve been injured and been told to do so, we would more likely adapt to the characteristic nine-life agility of cats.

Also, I understand old dogs have been proven quite capable of learning new tricks. With that in mind shouldn’t we be able to learn something just as well?

Lois Eckhardt may be reached at P.O. Box 413, Wellman, IA 52356

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